Saturday, June 14, 2014

Let's Increase Deficits, say Wisconsin Republican Congressmen; More Unpaid for Corporate Tax Cuts.

Remember, increasing the deficit is actually good if corporations can keep more of their money. And because money is speech, corporate freedom is bigger and better than ever.

Voters should be happy business is so actively trying to help Americans understand the issues that affect corporate profits and business liberty to fund campaigns. 

It's true Republicans are screaming bloody murder over the nations problem with deficits, but that has more to do with giving money away to lazy freeloaders than dumping more cash into the pockets of big business. 

Unpaid for Tax Cuts, Again: Still in drunken sailor mode, Republicans are still cutting taxes for businesses without offsetting increases somewhere else, while Democrats push for fiscal sanity. Roll Call: 
CORPORATE TAX BREAKS, LARGER DEFICITS: The House passed a Republican-drafted bill (HR 4453) that would lower tax liabilities in certain instances when companies convert from “C corporation” to “S corporation” status. Because the bill is not paid for, it would add $1.5 billion to federal deficits between fiscal 2014-2024, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation.  A yes vote was to pass a bill providing corporate tax relief while raising annual deficits.
Oh, look, deficit slashing Paul Ryan, Jim Sensenbrenner, Tom Petri, and Reid Ribble voted to increase deficits. That's not what they're saying at public listening sessions.

Supposed "tax and spend Democrats" like Mark Pocan, Ron Kind, and Gwen Moore voted to cut the deficit.

Even Bigger Deficits: Big business is apparently struggling right now, and needs this budget buster:
DEPRECIATION TAX BREAKS, LARGER DEFICITS: The House passed a Republican-drafted bill (HR 4457) that would permanently grant depreciation tax breaks to medium-size and small businesses. Such breaks now are temporary but are routinely renewed on an annual basis. Because the bill is not paid for, it would add $73 billion to federal deficits between fiscal 2014-2024, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation. In part, the bill would permanently raise to $500,000 the annual cost of qualified property that businesses can deduct from taxable income immediately rather than over many years.

A yes vote to depreciation tax breaks while raising annual deficits: Ryan, Sensenbrenner, Petri, Duffy, Ribble
Voting to reduce the deficit, Pocan, Kind, Moore.

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