Monday, September 15, 2014

Walker springs Big Government Drug Test on Wisconsinites who we all know are drug addicts.

Boy, we’re so not in Wisconsin anymore.

Scott Walker’s talk of actually drug testing childless individuals getting unemployment and/or food stamps is the height of big government Republicanism. So now we can confirm the unemployed are drug addicted freeloaders? Can you say kick ‘em when they’re down? Unconstitutional?

What Republicans don't want to deal with are the “free market” consequences of their corporate offshoring/inversion policies. Yea, go after the guy who lost his job instead of asking why big business has scaled down their workforce while pushing their "job creator" myth. And Republicans continue to use the courts to push for everything they want:
Gov. Scott Walker's promises for a second term include cutting property and income taxes for individuals and requiring drug tests for those seeking unemployment and food stamp benefits. "We believe that there will potentially be a fight with the federal government and in court. ... Our goal here is not to make it harder to get government assistance; it's to make it easier to get a job," Walker said.
Walker rationalizes unwarranted drug testing by suggesting he's actually helping the unemployed pass their employer drug test. What a guy? Did you ever get the idea this guy never had a real job in his life? Who requires drug tests? Let's start with politicians? I wish.
 

Rep. Robin Vos had to chime in:
Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R-Rochester) said ... that the federal government should take its cues from state officials and try to help them reach goals like that rather than hinder them. "The system is upside down. It should be us pushing them," Vos said.
John Nygren loves the idea too, and said so on WPR’s Joy Cardine Show, included in the audio clip below. But what Walker, Vos and Nygren are proposing is only a starting point. Despite the unconstitutional nature of drug test, the following repugnant rant contains many of the ideas above, and a few additional suggestions mentioned often by Rep. Paul Ryan. Let’s be clear, this is how conservatives think, starting with Nygren, and ending with former Arizona state senator Russell Pearce:


Huffinton Post: Former Arizona state Senator Russell Pearce resigned as Arizona Republican Party's first vice chair late Sunday after receiving criticism over recent comments he made about women on Medicaid.
"You put me in charge of Medicaid, the first thing I'd do is get [female recipients] Norplant, birth-control implants, or tubal ligations," Pearce said. "Then, we'll test recipients for drugs and alcohol, and if you want to [reproduce] or use drugs or alcohol, then get a job … (people out there [who] need help) " should get it from "family, church, and community," not the government.

“No cash for Ding Dongs and Ho Hos, you’d only get money for 15-pound bags of rice and beans, blocks of cheese and powdered milk – all the powdered milk you can haul away. If you want a steak or frozen pizza, then you’d have to get a job. Ever live in a military barracks? You’ll maintain your property in a clean, good state of repair, and your home will be subjected to an inspection at any time, possessions will be inventoried. If you want a plasma TV or an X-Box 360, then get a job.”
 Ironically, Pearce and most Republicans call the above “small government?” Oh, and the old tube TV's, you can't buy them anymore, so enough with with the big flat panel TV talk:
Pearce insisted he favored a small-government solution to poverty.
Pearce is like every other Republicans, he’s a freeloader:
When he’s not hosting his KKNT-AM program, Pearce helps promote the Elderly Assistance Fund in his taxpayer-paid position in the Maricopa County treasurer’s office ... paid $85,000 a year in that role, the newspaper reported, and he also draws a public pension from previous government work. Pearce accepted but didn't report nearly $40,000 in paid junkets and college football tickets from Fiesta Bowl officials while helping them receive state subsidies. 

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