Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Fiorina says U.S. can't change climate, so why try? Wants to make coal "less bad."

Carly Fiorina is not a smart person, and I’m not afraid to saying it. Let’s face it, you can’t be a Republican presidential candidate without being completely out to lunch, appealing to the lowest common denominator.

Like most Republicans, Carly admits defeat right away, essentially saying there’s no such thing as American exceptionalism. She's saying climate change can’t be done by just the U.S. alone, so, that’s it, can’t be done. That’s the American spirit.
JOHN HARWOOD: Do you believe that humans contribute to climate change and that government ought to do something about it?

Defeatist Republican Attitude- FIORINA: I believe if you're going to go to science, you need to read the fine print. And here's what the scientists say: A single nation acting alone can make no difference at all. The only answer to this problem, according to the scientists, is a three-decade global effort, coordinated and costing trillions of dollars. Are you kidding? It'll never happen.
But even more bizarre is the solution; “innovation.” Huh? Yes, magical innovation will turn even coal into something “less bad.” Oh, and did you know big energy isn't "powerful enough" yet to innovate. They need more power and money, because tens of billions in profit isn't enough. Would I kid you:
Innovation Magid- FIORINA: The answer is innovation. And the only way to innovate is for this nation to have industries strong enough that they can innovate. So we're going to become the global energy powerhouse of the 21st century. To create jobs, to make the bad guys less bad, and so that we have industries including the coal industry that's powerful enough to be able to innovate. That's how you're going to solve an intractable problem. It's always the way you solve an intractable problem. Not with regulation—with innovation.
Republicans like big talking millionaires, no matter how bad they've failed in the past. Here's a quick reminder:
In an article about worst CEOs in USA Today in 2005, Yale business Professor Jeffrey Sonnenfeld said that Fiorina was "the worst because of her ruthless attack on the essence of this great company. ... She destroyed half the wealth of her investors and yet still earned almost $100 million in total payments for this destructive reign of terror."
Oh yes, there's more, when asked today if he could add to his 2005 opinion:
"...while Fiorina was at HP, "virtually everything she bought ... has been shuttered or divested." He pointed out — emphasis his — that "She has NEVER been offered another CEO position in the decade since."
Failure is a prerequisite in the Republican Party, because apparently, even the following hasn't swayed Fiorina backers:
My brother, smiling, scaring me...
Yahoo: In an article about worst CEOs in USA Today in 2005, Yale business Professor Jeffrey Sonnenfeld said that Fiorina was "the worst because of her ruthless attack on the essence of this great company ... She destroyed half the wealth of her investors and yet still earned almost $100 million in total payments for this destructive reign of terror." While Fiorina was at HP, "virtually everything she bought ... has been shuttered or divested." He pointed out — emphasis his — that "She has NEVER been offered another CEO position in the decade since." 

She's famous for buying Compaq over the strong objections of some board members. Fiorina angered many employees with a massive layoff right after the acquisition, cutting a reported 30,000 HP jobs. Fiorina was accused of off-shoring thousands of HP jobs and making the workers who lost their jobs train their overseas replacements. 

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