Monday, October 27, 2014

Promoting free markets, individual freedom, and personal responsibility, MacIver Institute's anti-Minimum Wage argument relies on government help.

The lunatic fringe at the conservative MacIver Institute performed another useless study based on a $15 hike in the minimum wage. I thought we were talking about $10.10? Hey guys, why not $50, $100, or maybe $1 million an hour? Let’s debate a hike that no one’s talking about?
An increase in the minimum wage to $15 an hour would result in the loss of 91,000 jobs across Wisconsin, according to a new study from the John K. MacIver Institute for Public Policy. Of the 91,521 jobs that would be lost under a $15 minimum wage, more than half (51,292) of the losses would be for women.
Ouch. This is even worse than last year’s lengthy report using the same $15 hike, now scrubbed from their site. MacIver is definite about the job losses (not projected?), and ignores the real world data: “13 states raised their minimum wages at the beginning of this year. Those states have added jobs at a faster pace than those that did not raise the wage.”

But I couldn't resist posting this story for the following MacIver summation of their findings; forget DEMAND, get government involved?
The report is based on data collected by economists David Macpherson of Trinity University (TX) and William Even of Miami University (OH). "Instead of forcing local businesses to absorb excessive increases in labor costs, policy makers should be finding real solutions that help employers grow their business and create more, better paying jobs," Healy added.
That doesn't make sense. So now they're telling us that government does create jobs? These small government zealots now want government to find "solutions," so they can help business by doing the impossible; “create more, better paying jobs?” My head is hurting.

Only DEMAND does that. MacIver wants us to believe that business will “create” jobs out of kindness and/or because they feel sorry for the unemployed! Great report guys.

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