Friday, February 21, 2014

Walker's staff, similar to the people you've read about in the John Doe emails, devised a way to Kill Common Core.

Our "divide and conquer" leader Scott Walker is going for the low information tea party voter now nationally, at the expense of Wisconsinites. Do we really have that many tricorn teabillies here in the dairy state?  

Behind the scenes, Walker decided to trash Common Core, the major investment school boards across the state made for their constituents, so a more politically advantageous approach could destabilizes public education and win votes.

In the following TMJ4 coverage, watch Madison area organizer Jeffrey Horn of "Stop Common Core in Wisconsin" basically rule out any possible standard:
Horn: "They're going to put a lot of effort into just teaching to the test, making sure kids do well on a test, regardless of what they actually learned." 
Huh? So after years of fighting conservatives over too much testing, they've turned the tables on us, and are now against testing. Of course that begs the question, how do we actually know what they've learned? Even worse, achievement tests and college exams are now geared to Common Core.

Think about it; Horn did what Rep. Don Pridemore could have done had he become State Superintendent. (Note: testing was a way to fail schools under NCLB, make them private, and to trash teachers.)



We've turned education over to Jeffrey Horn. No matter how teachers and districts superintendents begged to keep moving forward with Common Core statewide, it didn't matter, Republican knew better all along. All instigated by career politician and college dropout Scott Walker.

Weirder still, the Walker plan dumps local control too, a fact Horn seems to have missed:
Horn: "These standards are kind of the last nail in the coffin of putting local control to bed in Wisconsin." 
Here's a look at Walker's state academic standards proposal:
jsonline: A bill that could halt the implementation of more rigorous and nationally aligned reading and math academic standards in Wisconsin's public schools was written for state lawmakers by Gov. Scott Walker's staff, new documents show. If passed, the legislation would be one of the most aggressive measures taken nationally to slow or stop the Common Core State Standards.

The bill calls for the creation of a state academic standards board … The state board would be mostly made up of political appointees, and lawmakers could adopt standards the board recommended, even if the state superintendent disagreed.

Superintendent Tony Evers said in a statement that the standards bill amounted to a "partisan takeover of the bedrock of schooling: the standards that describe what our kids should know and be able to do in each academic subject area." "Are we ready for our legislators to debate and legislate academic standards related to evolution, creationism and climate change when they take up sciencestandards?" Evers wrote.

Virtually none of the Wisconsin critics of Common Core now raised objections when the standards were posted online for comment and adopted in 2010.
I know I followed the roll out, pros and con, since I had two kids in elementary school at the time.  

No comments: